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Robotower 2.0

Robotower 2.0 is a robogame where the robot has to tear down at least a tower, while the human player can defend them by going between the attacked tower and the robot. The human played can also get the control over the tower, making it unattackable by the robot, by pushing a button on its top. Every 2.5 seconds a LED turns on. When all the 4 LEDs are on, the tower is safe. Of course, in the meanwhile, the robot can attack another tower… To make the game interesting for a generic player, the robot builds a model of the ability of the player online, and adapt its performance to that of the player, aiming at equilibrate challenge and skill, following the theory of Flow. The robot is also able to decide how and when to perform specific behaviors (such as defective moves, or specific trajectories). AI and machine learning are used for this. Contact Person: Andrea Bonarini Youtube presentation clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3azXf8V64iM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3azXf8V64iM
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RoboTower

RoboTower is a PIRG (Physically Interacting RoboGame), a kind of Robogame characterized by dynamism and physical interaction among users and robots in non-structured environments. The game challenges both movement and cogitive skills. The robot has  to knock dowown yellow towers and the red tower. The human players can delay its activity by selecting a card to be put in front of the robot RFID cards that are read when the robot goes over them. Each card makes the robot doing some action (turn, go back, stop) or prebvents it from seeing the towers. Once used, a card can be used again after a time shorter as more yellow towers are standing). The game finishes either when the timeout is reached, or the red tower is down. Among the interesting aspects emerged in this game, is the hard involvement of players induced by timing pressure.
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Jedi Trainer

Jedi Trainer is a PIRG (Physically Interacting RoboGame), a kind of Robogame characterized by dynamism and physical interaction among users and robots in non-structured environments. This is a project aimed at implementing a system that recreates the Luke Skywalker’s training as a Jedi Knight: a quadricopter (drone) flies around the Player (trainee), who wears a special game uniform and wields a light-saber. the drone has a strategy to shoot the Player with laser blasts. The Player must parry those blasts with his light-saber. The player is supposed to wear a uniform with the double purpose of being identified and “feel” the game. The sword used is a red swimming noodle. Laser blasts are simulated by a special noise produced by the drone. The game is very dynamic, being the player able to move freely in the space, while the drone follows him/her, to keep the interaction on. D. Martinoia, D. Calandriello, A. Bonarini (2013). Physically Interactive Robogames: Definition and Design Giudeline. Robotics and Autonomous Systems. 61 (8), pp. 739-748. doi:10.1016/j.robot.2013.04.017 Contact Person: Andrea Bonarini
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Robogames

Interactive games with autonomous robots are one of the most challenging robotic research issues. The robot should involve the player, both physically and behaviorally, while acting in the real world. The games we are interested in are games where robot autonomy is exploited to obtain interesting, engaging games which may be implemented with cheap technology and enter in everyone’s home. Past experience is related to Robocup soccer robots, Edutainment, Affective Computing, and Rehabilitation. First steps in this direction were done in 2005 with our rehabilitation robot and with robots physically interacting with players through the remote control of a WII console (ROBOWII) and different sensors, including cameras. We have developed a number of games in the Physically Interactive Robogames (PIRG) framework, were lively movement and interaction are mandatory. We are evaluating the possibility to provide information gathered about the emotional state of people involved in games to the game controller robot, which should emotionally react raising the involvement of the human player in the game. An effective robot player needs to integrate edge technologies from robotics, interaction, and psychology. An interesting hardware (body) should be integrated with the needed functionalities to become a game companion, such as adaptation to the […]
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